Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from March, 2013

Attention Nurse Managers: It's the 21st Century

This week seemed to produce a flurry of stories* from former students about management absurdities they have experienced in their first year on the job, from managers with associates degrees through masters. Here are the best gems of the bunch.  When reading the stories, think about how much these management decisions could cost a healthcare system.
__________________________________________
"I was written up for calling a doctor by his first name."

Last I checked, doctors have called nurses by their first names --without the "Nurse" prefix-- for at least the last thirty years.  As long as the other person is OK with that kind of informality, does this really merit disciplinary action on the part of management?  How far behind twenty-first social norms does healthcare have to be?  We are not practicing in a 1970s soap opera any more.

Managers who use these petty power plays, get over yourselves and focus on something that actually improves patient outcomes.

_______…

Voices from the Frontlines: A New Graduate Nurse in Rural America

Melanie* is a former student who took a job in a rural hospital, deciding she would rather have a job sooner than later so her career could begin moving forward after graduation.  In a recent letter, she reflected on her first year's experiences.


"The hospital has its pluses and minuses - I always, quite often, remember what you said to me about how accepting this job would be wise in my long-term plan, because it would give me an understanding of how different systems work in different areas. It really has done so. It has been an eye-opening journey into the difficulties rural health systems face.
Rural hospitals have unique challenges that come from both their revenue sources and the locally available talent pool.  They can be great places to get experience with a wide range of patients.
"The good: The step down unit is 24 beds, with a ratio of 4:1. Because of the hospital's small size and inability to specialize, it's a kitchen sink as to what we get, which skil…

Translate